Data and stats for youth suicide

 

 

The numbers are harrowing.  Risks for LGBTQ youth are greater, helps are fewer.  This is true nationally, but in some areas risks are even greater.  The good news is that there are registered best practices that not only CAN help, but DO help. Check out this page to learn more about the numbers, and explore section to learn more about prevention and other helps.  Need some help right now?  It's just a phone, text or chat away:  http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org and http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/get-help-now

 

 

Many high school students reported that they had seriously considered suicide in the past year (CDC, 2010a).

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among teenagers (CDC, 2009a).

One out of every 53 high school students (1.9 percent) reported having made a suicide attempt that was serious enough to be treated by a doctor or a nurse (CDC, 2010a).

For each suicide death among young people, there may be as many as 100–200 suicide attempts (McIntosh, 2010).
Approximately 1 out of every 15 high school students attempts suicide each year (CDC, 2010a). 


Above from SAHSA's "Preventing Suicide, a Toolkit for High Schools"  http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content//SMA12-4669/SMA12-4669.pdf

 

• Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death among young people ages 10 to 24. [1]

• LGB youth are 4 times more likely, and questioning youth are 3 times more likely, to attempt suicide as their straight peers. [2]

• Suicide attempts by LGB youth and questioning youth are 4 to 6 times more likely to result in injury, poisoning, or overdose that requires treatment from a doctor or nurse, compared to their straight peers. [3]

• Nearly half of young transgender people have seriously thought about taking their lives, and one quarter report having made a suicide attempt. [4]

• LGB youth who come from highly rejecting families are 8.4 times as likely to have attempted suicide as LGB peers who reported no or low levels of family rejection. [5]

• 1 out of 6 students nationwide (grades 9-12) seriously considered suicide in the past year. [6]

• Each episode of LGBT victimization, such as physical or verbal harassment or abuse, increases the likelihood of self-harming behavior by 2.5 times on average. [7]

 

Above from the Trevor Project's "Facts About Suicide" 
http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/facts-about-suicide

 

SOURCES:

[1] CDC, NCIPC. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) [online]. (2010) {2013 Aug. 1}.  Available from:www.cdc.gov/ncipc/wisqars. 

 

[2] CDC. (2011). Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

[3] CDC. (2011). Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

[4] Grossman, A.H. & D'Augelli, A.R. (2007). Transgender Youth and Life-Threatening Behaviors. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behaviors.37(5), 527-37.

 

[5] Family Acceptance Project™. (2009). Family rejection as a predictor of negative health outcomes in white and Latino lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults. Pediatrics. 123(1), 346-52.

 

[6] CDC. (2011). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

[7] IMPACT. (2010). Mental health disorders, psychological distress, and suicidality in a diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths. American Journal of Public Health. 100(12), 2426-32.